2016 IIHS Top Safety Picks

2016 Top Safety Picks
(Photo Credit: IIHS)

Each year the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) releases its list of vehicles that have received either a Top Safety Pick or Top Safety Pick+ award for good ratings in all five of the standard crash-worthiness tests.

For a car or truck to earn a Top Safety Pick award, it must receive a basic rating for front crash prevention as well as good ratings in the following five crash tests: Small overlap front, moderate overlap front, side, roof strength, and head restraints. The Top Safety Pick+ distinction was first awarded in 2013, and requires vehicles to earn an advanced or superior rating in front crash prevention, as well as qualify for Top Safety Pick in all other categories.

All of the vehicles listed are 2016 models and it is important to note that some vehicles only received a Top Safety Pick+ when purchased with the optional extra forward crash protection. This year, there were more vehicles that received Top Safety Pick+ awards, with midsize and full-size sedans leading the overall industry. The list is broken down by vehicle class, denoted by size.

You can view the list by visiting the IIHS’s website here.

IIHS Best Used Vehicles For Teens

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(Photo Credit: Fotolia)

Each year the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) releases its list of the best used cars for teen drivers. Research was conducted on a wide range of factors, including statistics on claims propensity and fatalities of teen drivers based on vehicle size and type. IIHS also carried out a nationwide survey of parents to determine the choices parents make when purchasing a vehicle for their teenagers.

Results showed that while parents and teens frequently opted for cheaper, older vehicles, these choices often offered inadequate crash protection, regardless of vehicle size. 83% of teenagers were purchasing used vehicles, with the median purchase price of $5,300 and the average purchase price of $9,800. Size does matter, because while the vehicles most often purchased were midsize or full-size sedans, almost 30% of all teenage fatalities occurred in mini or small cars, with fatality rates generally decreasing as vehicle size increased.

IIHS then compiled a list of recommended used vehicles for teens based on four main criteria:

  • Lower power-to-weight ratios
  • Larger and heavier – No small cars were included
  • Includes electronic stability control
  • Received high ratings for crash protection

Once the list was compiled, Kelly Blue Book values were looked up for the recommended vehicles, and categorized as either Best Choices for teens under $20K, or Good Choices for teens under $10K for those shopping on a budget.

To view the IIHS’s list of recommended used vehicles for teen drivers, click here.