What is Automatic Emergency Braking?

automatic emergency braking
(Photo Credit: Ford Motor Company)

Yesterday the U.S. Department of Transportation (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety announced that twenty of the world’s largest car manufacturers pledged to make automatic emergency braking (AEB) systems standard on all of their new vehicles starting no later than September of 2022. The NHTSA estimates that this commitment from automakers will make AEB systems standard three years sooner than through a formal regulatory process. The IIHS estimates that during those three years, standard AEB systems will prevent 28,000 rear-end collisions and 12,000 resulting injuries.

Automatic Emergency Braking is a forward collision mitigating safety feature that helps prevent or reduce the severity of collisions. AEB integrates radar/laser and cameras along with a computer that gauges a vehicle’s speed relative to an object (a slower or stopped vehicle, pedestrian, cyclist, etc.) in front of it. In the event of an imminent forward collision, the car’s AEB system warns the driver of the possible collision, using alert sounds, lights, and/or tactile feedback such as vibrating the steering wheel.

If the system detects that the driver is not doing enough to avoid hitting the object, i.e. the driver may be distracted, fatigued, or experiencing a medical problem, AEB will apply the brakes to stop the vehicle, ideally with enough time to avoid the collision, or at least greatly reduce its severity.

Currently, AEB systems are available on about a quarter of new cars, and the NHTSA now considers automatic braking in its 5-Star ratings. The IIHS requires new vehicles to come with AEBs in order to qualify for a Top Safety Pick+, the highest award possible. According to the IIHS, vehicles with an AEB system are 14 percent less likely to experience a forward collision than vehicles that do not have it equipped.

You can read the official press release about the automaker AEB commitment on the NHTSA’s website.

Winter-Weather Driving

Winter-weather driving
(Photo Credit: Fotolia)

Winter-weather driving can be very dangerous if you aren’t prepared.  Here are some important safety precautions to help make sure that you and your vehicle are ready to take on the winter weather.

Be prepared:

  • Check your tires for proper inflation and tread depth, and make sure they are rated for winter conditions. Consider purchasing snow tires.
  • Check your wiper blades and top off your windshield washer fluid.
  • Keep your gas tank full. You’ll avoid running out of gas on a cold night and sometimes cars with low fuel levels are harder to start because of condensation in the tank.
  • Have your mechanic perform a tune-up to prevent a midwinter breakdown.
  • If your vehicle is rear wheel drive, place a few bags of sand or rock salt (100+ pounds) in the trunk to improve traction in snow. This can also be used as grit in case your vehicle gets stuck.
  • Prepare an emergency kit to keep in your vehicle. Some things to include: a cell phone and charger, blankets, flashlights with batteries, flares, pocket knife, non-perishable food, bottled water, shovel, windshield scraper and brush, first aid kit, basic tool kit, road map and compass, tow rope, jumper cables.

Your car is prepared. Now what?

Follow these simple tips when getting on the road:

  • Monitor weather reports. Plan your best route and allow more travel time to your destination.
  • Approach intersections with extreme caution even if you have a green light. Apply brakes gently to avoid sliding.
  • Turn on your lights when driving, even during the day as winter daylight can be dim.

We hope that these driving safety tips help prepare you for safe travels this winter.

PS: If you’re in the market for a new car, check out the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety’s Top Safety Picks.