Icy Sidewalks And Injury Prevention

SONY DSC
(Photo Credit: Fotolia)

Every winter, many people are injured when they slip and fall on icy sidewalks, driveways, and parking lots. These injuries can range from minor bumps and bruises to broken bones and head injuries. Whether you’re a property owner/manager or just going for a walk outside, there are some things you can do to help prevent injury to yourself or others when the pavement gets slippery.

For Property Owners/Managers

  • If you don’t have access to a snowblower or a plow, shoveling walking surfaces early and often during heavy storms will make the job easier and less stressful on your body. While shoveling, drink plenty of water and take breaks.
  • Make sure entrances and vestibules are kept dry or wet floor signs are present when water and slush are tracked into a building.
  • Check your local municipal government’s website to see if there are laws or ordinances regarding snow removal deadlines to avoid fines or citations.
  • Be mindful of the type of salt/de-icer you use on your driveway/walkway and apply only the recommended amounts as indicated by the manufacturer. Certain kinds are harmful to plants, animals, water supplies, and may even damage the surface itself.
  • Grit, such as sand, kitty litter, and gravel can help provide extra traction on stairs and sidewalks, especially when combined with salt or de-icer.
  • Lock all gates, doors, and fences leading to restricted or unused outdoor areas (such as bar or restaurant patios) to prevent trespassers and unauthorized visitors from slipping on untreated surfaces.
  • Risk Transfer – if you’re using a contractor to clear snow and ice from walkways, driveways and parking lots, make sure you have a signed contract with contractor assuming responsibility for this exposure and you are named as an Additional Insured on the contractor’s GL policy covering this operation.

For Pedestrians

  • Move slowly and try to keep your steps flat to the surface to avoid slipping on icy or wet areas.
  • Wear shoes or boots with plenty of traction. If the soles of your footwear are smooth or worn, they are more prone to losing grip on slippery surfaces.
  • Black ice may form when the temperature drops suddenly after a storm. Be especially careful walking outside after the weather has been cold and wet.
  • Watch out for traffic. Icy conditions for pedestrians mean icy roads for motorists who may lose control of their vehicles if they’re not careful.

Icy and untreated sidewalks are dangerous and can leave your home or business vulnerable to a injury claim or lawsuit. Following these tips can help mitigate your risk of being liable if someone slips and falls.

Business Continuity – Emergency Generators

Emergency Standby Generators Infographic
(Photo Credit: Mutual Boiler Re)

U.S. businesses lose $150 billion annually due to blackouts and weather-related events. Most commercial businesses today have emergency generators, which is an important first step. But it’s important to make sure the generator has been properly installed, and to perform routine maintenance, as illustrated by the infographic above (click to view full version).

Winter-Weather Driving

Winter-weather driving
(Photo Credit: Fotolia)

Winter-weather driving can be very dangerous if you aren’t prepared.  Here are some important safety precautions to help make sure that you and your vehicle are ready to take on the winter weather.

Be prepared:

  • Check your tires for proper inflation and tread depth, and make sure they are rated for winter conditions. Consider purchasing snow tires.
  • Check your wiper blades and top off your windshield washer fluid.
  • Keep your gas tank full. You’ll avoid running out of gas on a cold night and sometimes cars with low fuel levels are harder to start because of condensation in the tank.
  • Have your mechanic perform a tune-up to prevent a midwinter breakdown.
  • If your vehicle is rear wheel drive, place a few bags of sand or rock salt (100+ pounds) in the trunk to improve traction in snow. This can also be used as grit in case your vehicle gets stuck.
  • Prepare an emergency kit to keep in your vehicle. Some things to include: a cell phone and charger, blankets, flashlights with batteries, flares, pocket knife, non-perishable food, bottled water, shovel, windshield scraper and brush, first aid kit, basic tool kit, road map and compass, tow rope, jumper cables.

Your car is prepared. Now what?

Follow these simple tips when getting on the road:

  • Monitor weather reports. Plan your best route and allow more travel time to your destination.
  • Approach intersections with extreme caution even if you have a green light. Apply brakes gently to avoid sliding.
  • Turn on your lights when driving, even during the day as winter daylight can be dim.

We hope that these driving safety tips help prepare you for safe travels this winter.

PS: If you’re in the market for a new car, check out the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety’s 2016 Top Safety Picks.

Preventing Frozen Pipes

Frozen Pipes
(Photo Credit: IBHS)

Pipes that freeze and burst can result in extensive property damage. Once a pipe freezes, continued expansion and freezing causes pressure to build up in the pipe between the blockage and the faucet. This pressure causes the pipe to burst in areas where little or no ice has actually formed. Here are some precautions to help avoid frozen and burst pipes and water damage.

Be prepared:

  • For pipes most vulnerable to freezing—in attics, crawlspaces, and outside walls—insulate with foam sleeves or wrapping.
  • Caulk cracks and holes in outside walls and foundations to keep cold wind away from pipes.
  • Purchase a backup generator to keep your furnace running when power fails.
  • Know where to turn off the water supply or water pump.
  • Drain outside faucets and use insulated faucet covers (found at home improvement stores).

During periods of severe cold:

  • Keep cabinet doors open to let the warm interior air circulate around pipes under sinks and adjacent to outside walls.
  • Turn on all faucets to a slow drip to prevent pressure from building in the pipes.

Before leaving for an extended period of time:

  • Set the thermostat no lower than 65 degrees.
  • Ask someone you trust to check the property while you’re away.
  • Consider turning off the water and draining the system. Shut off the main water valve and turn on every water faucet—hot and cold—until the water stops running. You can then shut off the faucets since there will be no water, and therefore no pressure, in the system. When you return, turn on the main value and let faucets run until the system is full and pressurized.
  • Consider installing a temperature-monitoring device or using an app on your smartphone.

My Pipes Froze. Now What?

Turn on all faucets to release pressure. Turn off the water supply and call a plumber. Do not try to thaw the pipe using an open flame, as this will cause damage to your pipe and may cause a building fire. You might be able to thaw the pipe with a handheld hair dryer but do so slowly to avoid super-heating any adjacent wood and creating a fire hazard. Start at the faucet end of the pipe, with the faucet open. Never use electrical appliances while standing in water as you could get electrocuted.

For additional information on preventing or dealing with frozen pipes you can read more from the Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety.

Wood- and Pellet-Burning Stove Safety

woodstove

If this coming winter’s temperatures are even half as cold as last year, we’ll once again be doing everything we can to stay warm. For this, many turn to alternative forms of heating such as fireplaces, space heaters, boilers, and traditional wood or pellet stoves.

Wood or pellet stoves are an increasingly popular form of alternative or supplemental heating during the cold season, but like every form of heating, they must be used with care. As the prevalence of these stoves has increased, so has the number of fires caused by their misuse or improper installation and maintenance. If you plan on heating your home with a wood or pellet stove, make sure you take the necessary precautions by following the tips below:

  • Install the stove in a central room to maximize heating effectiveness.
  • Make sure your stove and chimney are Underwriters Laboratories tested and approved.
  • Hire a professional chimney sweep to keep the chimney’s flue and stove pipe clean and remove any blockages, oils, or creosote that may have built up.
  • Test smoke and carbon monoxide detectors in your home, especially in the room where the stove is located.
  • Use only the fuel type (wood, corn, pellets, coal, etc.) the stove is specifically designed to burn.
  • If you are using wood, make sure it is dry and well-seasoned.
  • Non-flammable floor protection such as tile should extend out at least 18 inches on all sides of the stove.
  • Always keep flammable materials away from any heating source.
  • Never use liquid fuel such as kerosene in a stove.
  • Prevent small children and pets from getting too close to the stove by putting up a non-flammable safety gate.
  • Run the stove only when your home is occupied.
  • Check the charge on your fire extinguisher to make sure it is full and ready to use in case of emergency.

Before installing a new stove in your home, check to make sure the installation will comply with your local fire and building codes and always hire a licensed and insured installer.

Additional information and safety tips about using stoves can be found at the Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety and at the Insurance Information Institute.

10 Questions to Ask Roof Contractors

Roofer rsd

As you’re researching contractors for work on your home or business, it is important to remember the lowest bid may not be the best bid. Here are 10 questions to ask a potential contractor before you sign an agreement:

  1. Are you licensed and insured with liability insurance? (A qualified contractor should carry liability and workers’ compensation insurance to protect you and them in the event of a roofing accident.)
  2. Are all the workers who will be working on my roof covered under your liability insurance?
  3. What type of shingles and which ice and water shield manufacturer do you recommend and why?
  4. Are you licensed by the roofing manufacturer you are recommending? Is your license active and current? (This is important for warranties and to ensure that the materials will be properly installed.)
  5. What is your warranty on your work? (This is in addition to the manufacturer’s warranty.)
  6. Would you be pulling the necessary permit?
  7. Will you be onsite with your crew to ensure the work is being done properly?
  8. Can you provide me with at least three references?
  9. How will you prepare my house and the surrounding plantings to protect them?
  10. What is your clean-up and disposal procedure?

To understand some of the answers behind these questions and why they are important, read “Prepare Your Roof for Winter 2015.”

Prepare Your Roof for Winter 2015

Ice Dam Diagram-01 without ND rsd

Last winter, many of us got an unwelcome introduction to the havoc ice dams can wreak. Even if you were able to avoid them, there are preventative measures you can take to prepare for Winter 2015. Damage from ice dams can be extensive and the repairs disruptive.

We’ve outlined some prevention tips relating to:

  • Ventilation and insulation of your attic.
  • Ice and snow shield installation.
  • What questions to ask a contractor when installing a new roof.
  • What steps to take once it starts snowing.


But first, what is an ice dam?

A line of ice that forms along the roof edge, an ice dam prevents melting snow from draining off the roof. As your attic warms up from the heat in your house the snow on your roof melts. If the temperature outside is warm enough, this water will harmlessly run down to your gutters (this is a good reminder to always make sure your gutters are clear). But when the temperature stays below freezing, this water backs up behind the ice dam and can seep under shingles and into your house.


What causes it?

Three factors create the “perfect storm” for ice dams:

  • Heavy, consistent snowfall and below-freezing temperatures
  • Inadequate ventilation and insulation
  • Poorly installed roofing materials

The first you can’t control. But the last two you can, and should consider addressing before the flakes fly.


Prevention now
ventilation and insulation

To properly ventilate the attic and roof to permit warm air to escape, consider installing any one, or an appropriate combination, of the following:

  • A ridge vent
  • Soffit vents (or make sure the ones you have are not blocked)
  • Roof vents or channels in the attic, from eaves to ridge

Proper insulation prevents heat loss into the attic that causes snow to melt. Consider:

  • Insulating your attic floor and the underside of your roof, making sure not to cover soffit vents.
  • Eliminating warm air leaking into your attic from around light fixtures, stair trap doors, pipe openings, and anything that cuts through the attic floor.


Prevention now – roofing / ice and water shield

When you are having a new roof installed consider having your roofer install an ice and water shield at least six feet up from the roof edge and two to three feet up the side walls of dormers. Work with your roofer to choose a good-quality material, one that’s substantial in thickness and self-seals around the roofing nails.

Confirm with your contractor that the shield will be installed over the fascia board and into your gutters, with the roof’s drip edge installed on top of the shield. This helps prevent water from finding a path behind your gutters and into your walls. Now is also a good time to have old flashing around any dormers or roof valleys replaced because older flashing becomes brittle and can let water enter.

But before you start any work, it’s important to use a qualified, licensed, professional contractor. There are several questions you should ask to help you choose the right roofer for you.


Once the snow starts – the roof rake

All property owners still need to keep on top of the snow when it starts to fall. A roof rake is an essential tool in this battle. Once you have one to two feet of snow on your roof, rake it off as high as you can safely reach and watch out for any wires. If you need to have your roof professionally cleared, make sure to use a qualified roofer as they understand the right way to clear your roof, mitigating any damage and subsequent repairs or leaks.

We hope these tips help you prepare as we head into winter.