Winter-Weather Driving

Winter-weather driving
(Photo Credit: Fotolia)

Winter-weather driving can be very dangerous if you aren’t prepared.  Here are some important safety precautions to help make sure that you and your vehicle are ready to take on the winter weather.

Be prepared:

  • Check your tires for proper inflation and tread depth, and make sure they are rated for winter conditions. Consider purchasing snow tires.
  • Check your wiper blades and top off your windshield washer fluid.
  • Keep your gas tank full. You’ll avoid running out of gas on a cold night and sometimes cars with low fuel levels are harder to start because of condensation in the tank.
  • Have your mechanic perform a tune-up to prevent a midwinter breakdown.
  • If your vehicle is rear wheel drive, place a few bags of sand or rock salt (100+ pounds) in the trunk to improve traction in snow. This can also be used as grit in case your vehicle gets stuck.
  • Prepare an emergency kit to keep in your vehicle. Some things to include: a cell phone and charger, blankets, flashlights with batteries, flares, pocket knife, non-perishable food, bottled water, shovel, windshield scraper and brush, first aid kit, basic tool kit, road map and compass, tow rope, jumper cables.

Your car is prepared. Now what?

Follow these simple tips when getting on the road:

  • Monitor weather reports. Plan your best route and allow more travel time to your destination.
  • Approach intersections with extreme caution even if you have a green light. Apply brakes gently to avoid sliding.
  • Turn on your lights when driving, even during the day as winter daylight can be dim.

We hope that these driving safety tips help prepare you for safe travels this winter.

PS: If you’re in the market for a new car, check out the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety’s Top Safety Picks.

Preventing Frozen Pipes

Frozen Pipes
(Photo Credit: IBHS)

Pipes that freeze and burst can result in extensive property damage. Once a pipe freezes, continued expansion and freezing causes pressure to build up in the pipe between the blockage and the faucet. This pressure causes the pipe to burst in areas where little or no ice has actually formed. Here are some precautions to help avoid frozen and burst pipes and water damage.

Be prepared:

  • For pipes most vulnerable to freezing—in attics, crawlspaces, and outside walls—insulate with foam sleeves or wrapping.
  • Caulk cracks and holes in outside walls and foundations to keep cold wind away from pipes.
  • Purchase a backup generator to keep your furnace running when power fails.
  • Know where to turn off the water supply or water pump.
  • Drain outside faucets and use insulated faucet covers (found at home improvement stores).

During periods of severe cold:

  • Keep cabinet doors open to let the warm interior air circulate around pipes under sinks and adjacent to outside walls.
  • Turn on all faucets to a slow drip to prevent pressure from building in the pipes.

Before leaving for an extended period of time:

  • Set the thermostat no lower than 65 degrees.
  • Ask someone you trust to check the property while you’re away.
  • Consider turning off the water and draining the system. Shut off the main water valve and turn on every water faucet—hot and cold—until the water stops running. You can then shut off the faucets since there will be no water, and therefore no pressure, in the system. When you return, turn on the main value and let faucets run until the system is full and pressurized.
  • Consider installing a temperature-monitoring device or using an app on your smartphone.

My Pipes Froze. Now What?

Turn on all faucets to release pressure. Turn off the water supply and call a plumber. Do not try to thaw the pipe using an open flame, as this will cause damage to your pipe and may cause a building fire. You might be able to thaw the pipe with a handheld hair dryer but do so slowly to avoid super-heating any adjacent wood and creating a fire hazard. Start at the faucet end of the pipe, with the faucet open. Never use electrical appliances while standing in water as you could get electrocuted.

For additional information on preventing or dealing with frozen pipes you can read more from the Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety.

2016 IIHS Top Safety Picks

2016 Top Safety Picks
(Photo Credit: IIHS)

Each year the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) releases its list of vehicles that have received either a Top Safety Pick or Top Safety Pick+ award for good ratings in all five of the standard crash-worthiness tests.

For a car or truck to earn a Top Safety Pick award, it must receive a basic rating for front crash prevention as well as good ratings in the following five crash tests: Small overlap front, moderate overlap front, side, roof strength, and head restraints. The Top Safety Pick+ distinction was first awarded in 2013, and requires vehicles to earn an advanced or superior rating in front crash prevention, as well as qualify for Top Safety Pick in all other categories.

All of the vehicles listed are 2016 models and it is important to note that some vehicles only received a Top Safety Pick+ when purchased with the optional extra forward crash protection. This year, there were more vehicles that received Top Safety Pick+ awards, with midsize and full-size sedans leading the overall industry. The list is broken down by vehicle class, denoted by size.

You can view the list by visiting the IIHS’s website here.

Before You Pick up Your Keys…

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As we continue to celebrate this festive holiday season, it’s important to take extra care to keep friends, family, ourselves, and others safe from impaired driving. While not new, the message and preventative steps bear repeating:

  • Plan ahead and designate a sober driver. Keep it fair and rotate who that person is for different days and events.
  • If you find yourself ready to leave a party with keys in your hand, and you know you have had too much to drink, ask someone for a ride, call a friend, or call a cab. Remember “Buzzed driving is drunk driving.”
  • Listen to friends and family with you at the party. They know you best. If they are strongly suggesting you shouldn’t drive home, they’re probably right and you should seek an alternative.
  • On the flip side, if you see someone who shouldn’t drive, offer to drive or help find another option.
  • If you see a vehicle moving erratically, pull over to stay out of its way and call the police.

Stay safe and enjoy the rest of this holiday season. Wishing you a Happy New Year!

Wood- and Pellet-Burning Stove Safety


If this coming winter’s temperatures are even half as cold as last year, we’ll once again be doing everything we can to stay warm. For this, many turn to alternative forms of heating such as fireplaces, space heaters, boilers, and traditional wood or pellet stoves.

Wood or pellet stoves are an increasingly popular form of alternative or supplemental heating during the cold season, but like every form of heating, they must be used with care. As the prevalence of these stoves has increased, so has the number of fires caused by their misuse or improper installation and maintenance. If you plan on heating your home with a wood or pellet stove, make sure you take the necessary precautions by following the tips below:

  • Install the stove in a central room to maximize heating effectiveness.
  • Make sure your stove and chimney are Underwriters Laboratories tested and approved.
  • Hire a professional chimney sweep to keep the chimney’s flue and stove pipe clean and remove any blockages, oils, or creosote that may have built up.
  • Test smoke and carbon monoxide detectors in your home, especially in the room where the stove is located.
  • Use only the fuel type (wood, corn, pellets, coal, etc.) the stove is specifically designed to burn.
  • If you are using wood, make sure it is dry and well-seasoned.
  • Non-flammable floor protection such as tile should extend out at least 18 inches on all sides of the stove.
  • Always keep flammable materials away from any heating source.
  • Never use liquid fuel such as kerosene in a stove.
  • Prevent small children and pets from getting too close to the stove by putting up a non-flammable safety gate.
  • Run the stove only when your home is occupied.
  • Check the charge on your fire extinguisher to make sure it is full and ready to use in case of emergency.

Before installing a new stove in your home, check to make sure the installation will comply with your local fire and building codes and always hire a licensed and insured installer.

Additional information and safety tips about using stoves can be found at the Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety and at the Insurance Information Institute.

10 Questions to Ask Roof Contractors

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As you’re researching contractors for work on your home or business, it is important to remember the lowest bid may not be the best bid. Here are 10 questions to ask a potential contractor before you sign an agreement:

  1. Are you licensed and insured with liability insurance? (A qualified contractor should carry liability and workers’ compensation insurance to protect you and them in the event of a roofing accident.)
  2. Are all the workers who will be working on my roof covered under your liability insurance?
  3. What type of shingles and which ice and water shield manufacturer do you recommend and why?
  4. Are you licensed by the roofing manufacturer you are recommending? Is your license active and current? (This is important for warranties and to ensure that the materials will be properly installed.)
  5. What is your warranty on your work? (This is in addition to the manufacturer’s warranty.)
  6. Would you be pulling the necessary permit?
  7. Will you be onsite with your crew to ensure the work is being done properly?
  8. Can you provide me with at least three references?
  9. How will you prepare my house and the surrounding plantings to protect them?
  10. What is your clean-up and disposal procedure?

To understand some of the answers behind these questions and why they are important, read “Prepare Your Roof for Winter.”

Prepare Your Roof for Winter

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In the record breaking winter of early 2015, many of us got an unwelcome introduction to the havoc ice dams can wreak. In case the next winter is just as harsh, there are preventative measures you can take to prepare for winter. Damage from ice dams can be extensive and the repairs disruptive.

We’ve outlined some prevention tips relating to:

  • Ventilation and insulation of your attic.
  • Ice and snow shield installation.
  • What questions to ask a contractor when installing a new roof.
  • What steps to take once it starts snowing.

But first, what is an ice dam?

A line of ice that forms along the roof edge, an ice dam prevents melting snow from draining off the roof. As your attic warms up from the heat in your house the snow on your roof melts. If the temperature outside is warm enough, this water will harmlessly run down to your gutters (this is a good reminder to always make sure your gutters are clear). But when the temperature stays below freezing, this water backs up behind the ice dam and can seep under shingles and into your house.

What causes it?

Three factors create the “perfect storm” for ice dams:

  • Heavy, consistent snowfall and below-freezing temperatures
  • Inadequate ventilation and insulation
  • Poorly installed roofing materials

The first you can’t control. But the last two you can, and should consider addressing before the flakes fly.

Prevention now ventilation and insulation

To properly ventilate the attic and roof to permit warm air to escape, consider installing any one, or an appropriate combination, of the following:

  • A ridge vent
  • Soffit vents (or make sure the ones you have are not blocked)
  • Roof vents or channels in the attic, from eaves to ridge

Proper insulation prevents heat loss into the attic that causes snow to melt. Consider:

  • Insulating your attic floor and the underside of your roof, making sure not to cover soffit vents.
  • Eliminating warm air leaking into your attic from around light fixtures, stair trap doors, pipe openings, and anything that cuts through the attic floor.

Prevention now – roofing / ice and water shield

When you are having a new roof installed consider having your roofer install an ice and water shield at least six feet up from the roof edge and two to three feet up the side walls of dormers. Work with your roofer to choose a good-quality material, one that’s substantial in thickness and self-seals around the roofing nails.

Confirm with your contractor that the shield will be installed over the fascia board and into your gutters, with the roof’s drip edge installed on top of the shield. This helps prevent water from finding a path behind your gutters and into your walls. Now is also a good time to have old flashing around any dormers or roof valleys replaced because older flashing becomes brittle and can let water enter.

But before you start any work, it’s important to use a qualified, licensed, professional contractor. There are several questions you should ask to help you choose the right roofer for you.

Once the snow starts – the roof rake

All property owners still need to keep on top of the snow when it starts to fall. A roof rake is an essential tool in this battle. Once you have one to two feet of snow on your roof, rake it off as high as you can safely reach and watch out for any wires. If you need to have your roof professionally cleared, make sure to use a qualified roofer as they understand the right way to clear your roof, mitigating any damage and subsequent repairs or leaks.

We hope these tips help you prepare as we head into winter.

Cyber Security Tips for Small Businesses

Man Holding Credit Card With Laptop Shopping Online
(Photo Credit: Fotolia)

In 2014, tens of millions of personal records were compromised by various data breaches. According to The Identity Theft Resource Center, there were 783 recorded data breaches last year, hitting a record high. But while these breaches were headlined by some of the more high-profile cases of JP Morgan Chase, Home Depot, Sony, and Staples, the vast majority of them occur within the small business community, and can cost a small business proportionally much more than the bigger guys. Last year, the average cost of a small retail business data breach exceeded $36,000, and perhaps more worrying, these businesses saw almost a third of their customers leave for good. People often lose trust and confidence in a business that has been hacked or has otherwise mishandled their personal information. This kind of event can also result in lost relationships with key partners and vendors, damage to your brand, and of course, a lot of lost time and stress.

October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month and in an effort to help protect you and your small business, here are some steps you can take:

  • Install updated POS systems with (Europay, MasterCard, and Visa) EMV “chip and pin” credit cards which prevent hackers from stealing data contained in standard magnetic strips.
  • Make sure all data being transferred online is encrypted. This includes any emails or files you may send to customers, vendors, or partners.
  • Avoid using Wi-Fi networks to prevent third-party interception of transferred data. If you must use a Wi-Fi, make sure it’s secured with a firewall and a WPA2 encryption.
  • Frequently back up your data to an offsite location to avoid a loss in the event of a fire or burglary.
  • Use common sense with password management as well as email accounts. Don’t use obvious or simple passwords, and don’t open any links that may appear malicious.
  • Shred all outdated or obsolete documents that may still contain sensitive or personal data.
  • Make sure you’re up to date on anti-virus software, and stay current by understanding what the latest security threats and protocols are.
  • Educate your employees to safeguard their own information, accounts, passwords, and shared data.

To learn more about how The N&D® Group can help protect your small business from a devastating data breach, click here.


Identity Theft Resource Center Breach Report Hits Record High in 2014.” ID Theft Center. IDT911, 12 Jan. 2015. Web. 5 Oct. 2015.

Small Businesses: The Cost of a Data Breach Is Higher Than You Think.” First Data. N.p., 2014. Web. 1 Oct. 2015.

Stop.Think.Connect. Small Business Resources.” US Department of Homeland Security. US Department of Homeland Security, 2 July 2015. Web. 5 Oct. 2015.

Locally Grown Insurance

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When people “buy local”, they do it for many reasons—the quality of the product, the reputation of the purveyor, the attention to craftsmanship and service. Our local roots are deep—we’ve been working with dedicated independent agents in your neighborhood to cover homeowners, drivers, and businesses for nearly 200 years.

“Locally Grown Insurance” embodies everything The N&D® Group has always stood for:

  • Our employees and agents live, work, and shop in your communities. So we know the people, the region, and the weather. We are committed to providing the best local service possible, from our fleet of Automated Claims Vans that can mobilize for fast, accurate, on-site appraisals and are equipped to provide settlement checks on the spot, to the fact that you can still visit our Dedham, MA headquarters and pay your bill in person, we are there when and where you need us.
  • We work with our valued network of the highest quality local independent agents. We set the bar high and make sure agents meet our demanding standards before they are appointed on behalf of our group. And we maintain close relationships with them to ensure the quality stays high.
  • A thriving community depends on the generosity of businesses who call it home. We are dedicated to the community through our work with local charitable organizations.

Because of our personal and local experience, we are able to offer coverage options that are applicable to where you live, work, and drive, and that can be personalized to your needs. Feel free to contact us or reach out to your local agent to find out how we can protect the assets you value, as well as benefit from our generous multiple policy discounts and feature-rich policies.

IIHS Best Used Vehicles For Teens

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(Photo Credit: Fotolia)

Each year the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) releases its list of the best used cars for teen drivers. Research was conducted on a wide range of factors, including statistics on claims propensity and fatalities of teen drivers based on vehicle size and type. IIHS also carried out a nationwide survey of parents to determine the choices parents make when purchasing a vehicle for their teenagers.

Results showed that while parents and teens frequently opted for cheaper, older vehicles, these choices often offered inadequate crash protection, regardless of vehicle size. 83% of teenagers were purchasing used vehicles, with the median purchase price of $5,300 and the average purchase price of $9,800. Size does matter, because while the vehicles most often purchased were midsize or full-size sedans, almost 30% of all teenage fatalities occurred in mini or small cars, with fatality rates generally decreasing as vehicle size increased.

IIHS then compiled a list of recommended used vehicles for teens based on four main criteria:

  • Lower power-to-weight ratios
  • Larger and heavier – No small cars were included
  • Includes electronic stability control
  • Received high ratings for crash protection

Once the list was compiled, Kelly Blue Book values were looked up for the recommended vehicles, and categorized as either Best Choices for teens under $20K, or Good Choices for teens under $10K for those shopping on a budget.

To view the IIHS’s list of recommended used vehicles for teen drivers, click here.