Emergency Preparedness Plans

The official logo for National Preparedness Month 2017. [High Resolution JPG]
(Photo Credit: Department of Homeland Security)

Sponsored by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the Department of Homeland Security, National Preparedness Month is observed annually during the month of September. The initiative aims to drive education and awareness surrounding disaster preparation and to encourage citizens to take steps that will prepare them for disasters at home, work, school, or while away. Knowing what to do in the event of an emergency can save time and lives.

Know What To Plan For:

While certain types of emergencies, such as fires, thunderstorms, heat waves, and power outages can occur just about everywhere, your preparedness plan should be tailored to the types of disasters specific to your geographic location. For example, people living in areas where hurricanes or flooding are common will have a different evacuation or preparedness plan than people who live inland. Businesses along active fault lines should be retrofitted for earthquake protection and be prepared to suspend operations for extended periods of time if an earthquake takes place. And those living near nuclear power plants should be aware of what to do in case an emergency alert is activated.

Make A Plan:

A comprehensive emergency preparedness plan will incorporate a list of important info (contact, medical, etc.) for family members or coworkers and contact info for various people/places such as hospitals, doctors, schools, or caretakers. The plan will outline things such as evacuation protocol, where to find emergency supplies and equipment, and disaster specific info (how to prepare a home for a hurricane, where to shelter for a tornado, the location of life jackets, etc.). Keep adequate supplies, emergency and medical equipment, and cash on hand.  An outline on how to create an emergency plan can be viewed here.

Consider Backups:

Your plan should include contingencies for what may arise based on the type of emergency. For example, during a power outage, you may not be able to receive alerts on TV or your cell phone. Gas, water, or food shortages may happen during events such as a mass evacuation. Make alternative evacuation routes in case of traffic, blocked roads, or flooding. Around the home or office, it’s important to know where every fire extinguisher, AED, first aid kit, and emergency exit may be in case access to the nearest one is blocked. Think of the potential issues that may arise for each type of emergency.

Communicate The Plan:

Whether it’s for home, work, or elsewhere, a disaster plan is only effective if everyone who may be involved is informed. At home, this will include all members of the household as well as a babysitter, neighbor, or a nearby relative who may be an emergency contact. Include emergency contacts out of town as well, if an evacuation is ordered. Having all members of the plan informed of what to do helps save time and avoid confusion in times of panic and dangerous conditions.

Run Practice Drills:

Once everyone understands their role in the emergency plan, the next step is to practice and test the plan. Simulating a real emergency, such as an incoming hurricane, will help members of the plan become more familiar with their responsibilities and identify any potential issues or conflicts. Run practice drills for each type of major emergency that you can expect in your area.

Review The Results:

After running your practice emergency drill, review the results with your team. Identify any bottlenecks, shortcomings, and/or vulnerabilities (single points of failure) that the plan may present and come up with solutions to these issues. If needed, rerun the drills and reassess the results, keeping in mind that the conditions present during the practice drill will probably be different during a real emergency.

To learn more about creating your own emergency preparedness plan, visit the Department of Homeland Security’s Ready.gov website.